It may be estimated that the entire Oroko Region has more than one hundred schools – Primary, Vocational, Technical, Commercial, and Secondary schools. Most of these schools are government created with little or no infrastructural facilities if compared to other Regions.
Yes, unlike “Yesterday”, our parents “Today” are determined to see their children go through education, especially the “Girl Child”. Unfortunately, most of their desire is very often threaten by their poor financial situation. They can not provide their children’s basic school needs (e.g. text books) because majority of them are subsistence farmers who make just a little to feed their families despite their hard work.

Read the Complete Reports of the attached documents here.

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Introduction.

It may be estimated that the entire Oroko Region has more than one hundred schools –
Primary, Vocational, Technical, Commercial, and Secondary schools. Most of these schools
are government created with little or no infrastructural facilities if compared to other Regions.

Yes, unlike “Yesterday”, our parents “Today” are determined to see their children go through education, especially the “Girl Child”. Unfortunately, most of their desire is very often threaten by their poor financial situation. They can not provide their children’s basic school needs (e.g. text books) because majority of them are subsistence farmers who make just a little to feed their families despite their hard work.

The Oroko Cultural Association, an organization with a functional structure based in the
United States of America is aware of the many problems in the Oroko Community and is
determined to intervene in development efforts that will impact a positive change in Oroko
Communities. One of these areas is in Education and the goal of the Book Drive Initiative is
to equip schools in Oroko Communities with relevant books and ensure the availability of
these books to users at all times. But because of her limited resources, she is forced to focus her activities to a few pilot schools or communities. If successful, this model could then be extended to other schools and communities in the Oroko Region in future.
However, to minimize bias and other self served interest in the selection process, the need to elaborate guidelines or criteria for selecting these pilot schools or communities for the Book Drive Initiative is important. This will increase our chances of success and ensure the
sustainability of the project.

Guidelines or Criteria for Selecting Pilot Schools/Communities

1. Geographic Distribution or “Regional Enclaves” – We all know that the schools and Oroko communities are distributed in different geographical regions (North, South, East, West, and Central) with defined administrative boundaries (divisions, subdivisions, and districts). The need to consider this aspect during the selection process is important. If for instance five schools or communities are selected then each region should be represented (Tata Louis Etongwe). Reading through members’ contributions this idea has been supported by Iya Gertrude Nanje and Tata Sam Esale.

2. Academic Excellence – It is suggested that schools in the region with excellent GCE results should be given priority. Over time this may even encourage competition amongst
schools if they are aware that this project will be extending to other schools in the future.
In a situation where three out the five schools come from one region, then each region will
be looked into separately. In each region the best GCE results will be considered for
selection. (Tata Sam Esale).
Indeed, this will require OCA, USA to compare GCE results in different regions individually. Hope the Ministry of Education will cooperate with the team in providing the necessary information.

3. Availability of a structure (e.g. library, community hall, etc.) to house the books – This
will not only secure the books for subsequent public use but it will also prevent the books
from ending in individual homes. The schools with such structures must also be willing to
exchange the books with teachers of surrounding villages (Tata Jackson Nanje).

4. The School or community authorities should guarantee OCA, USA of somebody to
oversee the management of the library or center – This individual should be willing to
learn new skills to effectively run the library or center (e.g. record keeping, checking-out
and checking-in of books, etc.)

5. Have a functional parents teachers association (PTA) – This will ensure further sustainability of the project since the association and the traditional authorities will be
involved in decision making on issues related to the library/center.

6. The school or center must give access to OCA, USA when need arises – This will give
OCA, USA the opportunity to assess progress and to identify need areas for improvement.

Ebile Adolf
(USA)